Hawkeye Huey, the 5-Year-Old Photographer, Releases New Book

In October 2015, Arizona Highways introduced its readers to Hawkeye Huey. Now, Hawkeye and his father, Aaron, are introducing the young photographer to the world.

Hawkeye, who's 6 now, built up a devoted Instagram following as he traveled the American West as a 5-year-old, shooting photos, with his parents (Aaron Huey is a National Geographic photographer). Their travels included Arizona, and we featured some of Hawkeye's photos and an interview with Aaron last year in a story titled Hawkeye Huey Was Here.

Now, the Hueys have collected some of Hawkeye's best work in a new hardcover book with a lengthy title: Cowboys Indians Hobos Gamblers Patriots Tourists & Sunsets. It went on sale last week.

The family says they hope "that this collection of his images and the journey [Hawkeye] took with his father will help you to see the genius of the creative vision that is inherent in all children."

To order a copy of the book, click here.

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More Arizona History: Making Bricks in Tucson

Here's our third and final look at At Work in Arizona: The First 100 Years, an Alliance Bank of Arizona book project that explores Arizona's economic history. The book is available at Alliance's Arizona locations and online with a donation of $100 or more. The donation supports education-focused nonprofit organizations in the state.

Tucson Pressed Brick Company, Tucson | Circa 1920s
The Tucson Pressed Brick Company, located along the Santa Cruz River on the west side of town, provided affordable, fire-resistant bricks for homes and developments from 1908 to 1963. In the early decades, brick makers at the company built rectangular, coal-fired stove kilns of unfired bricks (pictured) to kiln them.

(Photo credit: Arizona Historical Society)

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Marilyn Monroe's Arizona Connection

Here's another photo from At Work in Arizona: The First 100 Years, an Alliance Bank of Arizona book project that explores Arizona's economic history. The book is available at Alliance's Arizona locations and online with a donation of $100 or more. The donation supports education-focused nonprofit organizations in the state.

Marilyn Monroe, Bus Stop, Arizona State Fairgrounds, Phoenix | 1956
Norma Jean Baker, known forever as Marilyn Monroe, co-starred with Don Murray and Eileen Heckart (right, in dark glasses) in Twentieth-Century Fox's 1956 comedy Bus Stop. Adapted from William Inge's two plays, Bus Stop and People of the Wind, the production was partly filmed in downtown Phoenix and at the Arizona State Fairgrounds during the Phoenix Junior Chamber of Commerce's annual Rodeo-of-Rodeos. Monroe, who stayed at the city's historic San Carlos Hotel during the filming, won a Golden Globe for her performance, while Murray earned the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Arizona, which had been a popular vacation retreat for Hollywood A-listers for decades (the Arizona Biltmore's main pool was alleged to be Monroe's favorite), became a regular location for filmmakers after 1945 for its distinct Western landscapes, lightly populated rural vistas unfettered by power lines and development, and Western cities and towns rarely seen in motion pictures.

(Photo credit: Thomas Parks, Thomas Robinson Collection)

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New Alliance Bank Book Celebrates Arizona's Working History

A new coffee-table book produced by Alliance Bank of Arizona explores the state's economic history through historical and modern photos.

At Work in Arizona: The First 100 Years is written by Stuart Rosebrook and curated by Marilyn Szabo. Our own creative director, Barbara Glynn Denney, produced the book's layout.

The book is available at any of Alliance Bank's 10 locations in Arizona, or online, with a donation of $100 or more. All proceeds go to 12 of the state's most effective education-focused nonprofit organizations.

Over the next few days, we'll feature a few photos from the book, along with their accompanying stories. Here's today's entry for the above photo:

Jerome Mine Train, Jerome | Circa 1900
The United Verde & Pacific narrow-gauge railway was the innovation of United Verde Copper Company mine owner William A. Clark, who bought the mine in 1888. Clark's construction of the railroad to tie into the national railroad system, and expansion of the mine and the smelter, allowed the company to grow and prosper to become the largest copper mine in Arizona by 1900. In 1915, Clark built a standard-gauge rail line to his new smelter at the base of Cleopatra Hill in his company town, Clarkdale.

Photo credit: Jeremy Rowe Collection

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Save $12.99 on 100 Greatest Photographs Book (Now in Its Third Printing!)

100 Greatest Photographs to Ever Appear in Arizona Highways Magazine

100 Greatest Photographs to Ever Appear in Arizona Highways Magazine

We're excited to announce that our book 100 Greatest Photographs to Ever Appear in Arizona Highways Magazine is going into its third printing. If you're looking to get a jump on Christmas shopping, now's the time!

For a limited time, you can get the book for $27 instead of its normal price of $39.99. Just enter promo code P3M5PB at checkout when you order from the Arizona Highways online store.

From Navajo families and a Mohave girl to the splendor of the Grand Canyon and the grasslands of Southern Arizona, the 100 images that appear in the book are the best to have ever been published in Arizona Highways, as chosen by Photo Editor Jeff Kida and Editor Robert Stieve. As Stieve writes, “In my mind, there was no golden era, just decades and decades of spectacular photography — one great shot after another.” This book celebrates those great shots, both old and new, and pays tribute to the men and women who made them.

In addition to ordering from our online store, you can pick up 100 Greatest Photographs to Ever Appear in Arizona Highways Magazine at the Arizona Highways gift shop, which is located at 2039 W. Lewis Avenue in Phoenix.

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