Browse our nature archive.

North American Beaver

There’s no mistaking a North American beaver (Castor canadensis) for another semi-aquatic mammal, such as an otter. Beavers are bigger, beefier and, of course,…

Rufous Hummingbird

The idea of traveling 4,000 miles can be daunting, but not for rufous hummingbirds (Selasphorus rufus). They routinely fly that far as part of their annual…

Black Bear

You’ll find black bears (Ursus americanus) in all of Arizona’s national forests, as well as in some riparian desert areas. They’re the only bear species found in…

Desert Iguana

The scientific name for the desert iguana — Dipsosaurus dorsalis — is going to make you think you’re looking at a dinosaur, and it’s easy to imagine this species being a…

Spadefoot Toads

Aptly named, spadefoot toads spend the majority of the year in underground burrows they dig with their hind legs and bony, shovel-like feet. Four species live in Arizona:…

Water Dogs

As tadpoles are to toads, water dogs are to tiger salamanders: the fully aquatic larval form of the species. When water dogs metamorphose into adult salamanders, some lose…

American Bison

It's a familiar story, but in case you were sleeping through history class: Buffalo once roamed all across the grasslands of North America, from northwestern Canada, along…

Otters

Otters are about as intimidating as bears — teddy bears, gummy bears, Cal Bears. They're relatively nonthreatening, in part because of their chocolatey-brown fur, webbed…

Desert Tortoises

If misters are proof of anything, it's that it takes a little moisture in the air to get Arizonans to even consider moving around in the summer. Desert tortoises are…